Portal opening



Ramblings about life . . .

What I share about my life is simply to help reinforce the understanding that it is possible to live with love and laughter, in between the tough times.

Life is what we make of it, no matter how harrowing. We accept and embody this with-in ourselves, thereby allowing the energy to manifest outwardly in our reality.

It starts with each one of us as an individual to form the collective consciousness.

Be the dream.

We honour the light and the life within you.

Please be aware - I upload other bloggers' posts and then delete after a month. This is my journey and others help me understand where I am, until they become irrelevant (a few posts excepted).



Sunday, 27 August 2017

I'm still standing

I am loving every moment, well most moments, in the position.

I've always been shy and, what most would call, aloof. That has changed without me noticing. I find myself being pushed into situations with strangers and to my surprise, I'm okay with it.



I am in meetings day in and day out, getting to know how the hospital gears grind with the slowness of a dinosaur and so inefficiently. Aargh!

But to be fair, when persuaded, the cumbersome dinosaur can get up off its ass, change direction quickly and run. Haha that is a funny image.

We kept on getting told that certain things couldn't be done, but meeting the people face to face, having discussions, helping them to understand what we need, goes a long way to creating working and amiable relationships. Co-operation is the key. Once these foundations are built, nothing is too much trouble. In fact, initiative is becoming a buzz word. There have been a few occasions where those who've said it's impossible, have found new ways and come up with some amazing changes. Now that is thinking outside the box at its best.

We service many smaller hospitals, called the T-hospitals (the town's name starts with a T lol). The Waikato covers a vast area. I've had several meetings with the outlying smaller hospitals' Nurse Managers. It is interesting to share ideas, build relationships and network.

Back at the Sleep Lab, we've made changes, and are still making changes, to the rooms and their configuration. It is not perfect, but we do the best we can with the small space allotted to us. The doctors, their Registrars and each physiologist are getting their own clinic room. This will make for a better flow, as currently the physiologists get shoved around, finding places to work from, which is mostly the physiologist room from where we do our night studies. And finally, I will get my own office as currently I move from place to place with my overloaded tray of things to do.

Both receptionists are in one area rather than two separate places, also playing hotseat and working from wherever they can. Unfortunately things move slowly, booking the carpenter to move shelves/cupboards or build desks; the IT people to add LAN ports where needed and move computers and phones; and the electrician to create more plugs, etc. I've also made sure that all the clinic room computers have every single piece of software that we use. Previously it was only in the physiology room computers which became really crowded with physiologists setting up/downloading/analysing, equipment everywhere. So much clutter makes it hazardous to work.

My one and only complaint is that we are stuck in the basement (the dungeon). We have no windows to the outside world. We never know what the weather is like. So day in and day out I feel a little like a mole, every so often popping topside for a breath of fresh air and some sunlight. We can gauge from the patients' outerwear what the weather is doing. 

Things are coming together. The young locum who is helping out with night studies, started this week. Thus we can do more studies at night. The one night physiologist has been on his own for months, since I've taken up the Team Leader position. As I've worked with him consistently at night over the last year and a half, I know his capabilities and knowledge, and can therefore trust him to teach the locum how we want things done.

The other physiologist is on a back to work scheme after her surgery. Hopefully she will be back to her normal work routine mid September.

It has taken one hell of an adjustment for all of us. We've made so many changes I often have to stop and think about what the next step is. It certainly helps to have protocols and procedures as well as flow charts to refer to.

There have been a few things we've had to tweak again, as it hasn't worked, which thankfully aren't many.

And...we are getting a uniform and the night staff are getting scrubs. The idea of wearing a uniform has been enthusiastically embraced, even by the admin staff. We've been scouring catalogues for appropriate wear for all concerned. We think we've finally settled on something but are trying to find it at a cheaper rate. The admin Team Leader has been extremely helpful, it's so great to connect with others that have ideas.

I love that everyone is so open to discussion (even the doctors), when we get a chance to, how things are going, whether adjustments need to be made and how. There have been so many invaluable ideas and initiatives. I am very grateful to everyone.

The Sleep Lab staff are fantastic, reliable, trustworthy...and happy. Although there have been a few occasions this winter when I've been without quite a few staff due to illness. Even so, those of us left to contend with the clinics have managed without problem. And this is where I come in. I don't sit in my ivory tower issuing orders. I muck in with the rest of them. I've always believed a leader should lead from the front, not stand at the back telling everyone what to do.

I'm not sure where I get all the energy to do what I need to do. I seem to have a boundless amount of energy. I can only think it comes from being passionate about what I do and in the flow. Lol, I am knackered when I get home and sleep like the dead from about 8.30 to 6am. I wake feeling refreshed and ready to face the day.

I'm sincerely hoping all will calm down and that the adjustment time my body needs to doing "normal" five day week won't take too much longer.

"I'm still standing"



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